Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Would and Should Exercise

The modals ‘would’ and ‘should’ can both be used with first person pronouns I and we as the less definite form of will and shall. Note that… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/exercise-24/

Structures with Wish | Grammar Exercise

The verb ‘wish’ is used in several different structures. Wish + infinitive means want. Note that progressive forms are not used. Wish can also be… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/structures-grammar-exercise/

App Smashing with Kindergarteners #ipadchat

A conversation with Carrie Willis on episode 83 of the 10-Minute Teacher

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Today Carrie Willis @carriewillis18 talks about how kindergarteners in her STEAM lab use their iPads. They use SeeSaw portfolios, green screen videos, and more. She also talks about what the students do and what the adults do.

App Smashing with Kindergarteners

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Listen on iTunes

Click the button for iTunes or Stitcher to subscribe to this show

10-Minute Teacher Show Stitcher

 

In today’s show, Carrie Willis talks about the workflow in her kindergarten classroom with iPads:

  • How they use Seesaw
  • Making videos with green screen
  • What kindergarteners can do thsmselves
  • The challenges of kicking off an ipad lab
  • Workflow with kids

I hope you enjoy this episode with Carrie Willis!

Want to hear another episode on elementary portfolios with SeeSaw? Listen to Suzy Lolley talk about elementary portfolios with SeeSaw.

Selected Links from this Episode


Some of the links below are affiliate links.

Full Bio As Submitted


Carrie WillisCarrie Willis kindergarten ipad

Carrie Willis is the technology teacher and director at Valley Preparatory School in Redlands, Ca.

Carrie is an Apple Teacher, Microsoft Innovative Educator, DEN STAR, Wonder Innovation Squad member, and all-around techie.

She loves STEAM, PBL, coding, robotics, green screen, app smashing and more. You can follow her on Twitter @carriewillis18.

Transcript for this episode


Click to download the PDF transcript

[Recording starts 0:00:00]

Are you planning your summer like I am? Well I recommend that you get the free video series from my friend Angele Watson. Five summer secrets for a stress-free fall. Just go to coolcatteacher.com/summer.

On the last episode we talked about iPads in kindergarten www.coolcatteacher.com/e82 . Well, today we’re talking about app smashing in kindergarten. This is Episode 83.

The Ten-minute Teacher podcast with Vicki Davis. Every week day you’ll learn powerful practical ways to be a more remarkable teacher today.

VICKI:              Carrie Willis @carriewillis18 from California has been app-smashing with her kindergarteners. Oh my goodness, Carrie, what have you done?

CARRIE:       I’ve been having a lot of fun, we have a brand new STEAM lab at our school this year, so that’s science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. And we’ve had all of us students, grades pre-school through 8 come to our steam lab and just kind of partake in some amazing design projects, engineering projects, technology projects. So I’d like to talk about our kindergarteners today with you.

VICKI:          Cool. Yeah, I think I saw you on Twitter and you were talking about how they were using Aurasma https://www.aurasma.com/ . Had done a show recently on Aurasma http://www.coolcatteacher.com/e52 . But tell us about this project, what did you do?

CARRIE:       So our kindergarten students were taking part in in our international baccalaureate unit on sharing the planet and they had been studying insects and habitats and life cycles and kind of how insects share the plant with humans as well as other living things. So as part of our design and engineering unit in our STEAM lab we had the kindergarteners build different organisms and living things out of K’NEX http://amzn.to/2rPSWcC .

[00:02:00]

And we used a K’NEX for education kit called organisms and life cycles. http://amzn.to/2qViqF3   And each student was given a different – kind of like an instruction challenge card where they kind of followed the instructions and built their living things. And then after they were finished we studied food web that included all of these different living things they had built out of K’NEX. So it was like a poster that showed all the living things in the K’NEX kit and where they kind of fell in a food web, you know. You know, what they ate and what ate them.

And the kindergarteners got to study this and do a little bit of research and tried to figure out if they had a caterpillar what does this show that the caterpillars eat and what eats the caterpillars. And then we talked about if this particular student had the caterpillar, what kind of habitat the caterpillars lived in. and they kind of wrote down some facts, some things that they learned from this poster, this bit of kindergarten research that didn’t involve any words but just kind of studying a picture.

And then we used our green screen that we have in our classroom and we used the app, Green Screen by Do Ink https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/green-screen-by-do-ink/id730091131?mt=8   which we absolutely love. If you don’t already have that app downloaded on your iPad and you’re a teacher you need. And I don’t work for them, I just love it that much. And so we put the habitat of the particular organism that student had built in the background and the students sit in front of the green screen and explained kind of their organisms place in this food web or in a food chain and recorded a little video and then made the poster come to life by using Aurasma. https://www.aurasma.com/

And if you’ve never used Aurasma before, it’s an app where you can take a video and overlay it on a still picture, like an actual physical picture. In this case a poster.

[00:04:00]

So we would overlay the video of the student with the caterpillar in front of the green screen on top of the caterpillar image on the poster. So when you hold your phone over the picture on the poster that picture would come to life as a video.

VICKI:          So Carrie, I’m curious, you’ve already blown the minds of many people and you’re talking kindergarteners. How much of this work did you have to do and how much did they actually do?

CARRIE:       So the students built their organism, their living thing from the K’NEX all on their own, most of them did not need any help at all. And then when they were finished building they would go over to this poster that we had and they would kind of study the poster and see if they could kind of track the food web and figure out what their organism ate and what eats it. And this wasn’t hard for them because they have been studying this sort of thing in their classroom already having to do with their insect unit that they had been working on. So they knew what he predators were and what insects have food sources.

So they were able to easily kind of analyze this poster and follow it and then most of them had an easy time kind of being able to come up with what sort of habitat their particular living thing would live in. So these kind of range from – there was frogs, there was tadpoles, there was a bald eagle, there was a crab, fish, different insects, there was a mouse. So it was all different things. So they would say whether or not they thought that they lived in a pond or in the ocean.

VICKI:          So they did a pretty good job with the building of the K’NEX and the describing on the green screen. Now, were they able to actually edit the video at all?

CARRIE:       At this point no, they probably would be able to do that but for time sake we just pulled up and image and we did the filming in this case.

[00:06:00]

VICKI:          Okay.

CARRIE:       Our kindergarteners actually have done things with video, they’ve used See Saw and Book Creator to kind of record little journals of their caterpillars, fed them and watched their lifecycle as they turned into butterflies and released them. So they chronicled their lifecycle of their butterflies that they patched in their classroom and they did that themselves using SeeSaw https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/seesaw-the-learning-journal/id930565184?mt=8 and Book Creator https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/book-creator-for-ipad/id442378070?mt=8 to create little video journals of this.

So they have done work with video, they just didn’t in this particular case with the green screen video.

VICKI:          Cool. So you’ve just done this incredible app-smashing project and it sounds like a whole lot of technology but you know the question people always ask is did they learn about habitats and insects better with using the technology than they would have without?

CARRIE:       I don’t know if they learned about it better but I feel like they definitely will remember it better because they will go back and they will watch these videos over and over again. I remember as a child different videos and projects that I did but definitely don’t remember worksheets that I did, I definitely don’t remember chapter reviews from my science book. But I definitely remember when I had to create this video as part of my science class on different parts of the body and different bones and muscles.

I mean, I can recite that back because I remember creating this awesome project. So I think there’s a bit more retention when you do these kind of exciting projects with kids.

VICKI:          So we talked with Carrie Willis about app-smashing in kindergarten, it can be done, you can do some really cool things. And I think that we need to give kids the chance and not be scared of these big long names and just let kids create and innovate using technology. We’ve got such a great example form Carrie today.

CARRIE:       Thank you. And I think it’s important to introduce kids to this technology. We don’t have to expect them to be able to do it at this young age but introducing it to them now, they’ll remember that later when they’re a little bit older, when they are matured enough to be able to use it themselves to create great projects.

VICKI:          If you follow my newsletter or blog you’ve probably heard me talk about Angela Watson’s 40-Hour Work Week. coolcatteacher.com/quiz  This program really helps you to be a better teacher, have better classroom management and more organized classroom and so many things. Now, Angela used to be a 5th grade teacher but I’ve actually found a lot of things applicable to my 8th grade and up classroom.

So you can take a quiz to see if this program is right for you. Just go to coolcatteacher.com/quiz and learn more about Angela Watson’s 40-Hour Work Week.

[End of Audio 0:09:18]

[Transcription created by tranzify.com. Some additional editing has been done to add grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. Every attempt has been made to correct spelling. For permissions, please email lisa@coolcatteacher.com]

The post App Smashing with Kindergarteners #ipadchat appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/app-smashing-kindergarteners-ipadchat/

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Take the 21-day Productivity Challenge #makeitstick

DIY Productivity with Post-it® Brand Products

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

The end of the school year is so busy. Now is the time to get organized. In this blog post, I’ll give you my 1-2-3 steps to stress less and 5 productivity hacks. Many of them involve Post-it® Brand Products. I use them all the time, from storyboarding, to drafting articles, to accenting my DIY planner.


This blog post is sponsored by Post-it® Brand

What productivity type are you? Take the quiz

21-Day Productivity Challenge

So, as part of my work with Post-it® Brand, I’ve been asked to design a 21-day challenge to boost productivity. As a teacher, I’ve picked 3 simple things that I know will boost productivity (and my mood) and I’m going to do this for 21 days. I also watched the four videos from the Post-it® Brand productivity experts including chef Russell Jackson, Teacher of the Year Sia Kyriakakos, fitness artist and spiritual wellness expert, Nicole Winhoffer and health business owner, Anna Young to use their productivity ideas and tips.

1 – One thing at a time

post-it productivity challenge

I keep my current “Big 1” task at the bottom left hand side of my monitor. This is my focal task. I do this at school and home. It helps me focus on just one thing at a time.

Multitasking is a myth. Focus is necessary to get anything done. To keep on track, I am committing to focus on ONE thing at a time. Just one.

To find out what kind of planner I am,  I took a quiz using the Post-it® Brand Productivity Tool. In their research, they found that there are four types of planners. As a “Mindful Maverick” I learned that I need visual cues.

So, I write the current task on the bottom left-hand side of my computer monitor on Post-it® Super Sticky Notes. One task, one at a time.
I’ve used Post-it® Notes for years in this way. Seeing the results of the productivity quiz, I now know why I’m always happier when I write down my most important task and keep it front and center. As a teacher, I live in a rushed environment and seeing one task on my computer redirects my attention back to my main task.
According to the a survey conducted by Post-it® Brand, more than 1 in 4 Americans feel completing everything on their weekly to-do list is harder than running a marathon.* 
I think part of the problem is many of us put too much on our list. Another reason might be our lack of focus. Writing my current focal task on a Post-it® Note and keeping it on my computer monitor throughout the day helps me focus. Swapping it out for a new one gives me a sense of progress!

2 – Two kind notes a day

I’m inspired by the wall of kindness that was started with one kind Post-it® Note in the girls’ bathroom at Principal Will Parker’s school.

Part of my purpose as a teacher is to spread kindness and positivity to my students and colleagues.
I was so inspired by what happened at Principal Will Parker’s school this year. One of his students posted a kind Post-it® Note in the girl’s bathroom. As other students joined in, it grew into hundreds of Post-it® Notes with kind messages. Kindness went viral!
“Remember there’s no such thing as a small act of kindness. Every act creates a ripple with no logical end.” -Scott Adams
So, I’ve committed to write two kind Post-it® Notes a day and stick them somewhere in the school to encourage others to make others smile and encourage them to do the same. The teacher’s lounge. My room. The bathroom mirror. Yes, I’m doing this!
There have been times I’ve wanted to encourage a colleague. I’d buy their favorite cola or snack and leave it on their desk with a quick anonymous Post-it® Note. It really does encourage people. 

3 – Three most important things

In my planner, I keep my “big 3” on Post-it® Super Sticky Notes to make sure they get done. I use the same system for home and work – 3 in each place!

Don’t confuse quality with quantity. Yes, my master list has many things on it. (See below for how I brain dump my list to organize it.)
However, this time of year, I just have so much to do that I list my three most important things. No matter what else gets done, these are a must.
I’ll admit. I have three things for home and three things for school.
The research commissioned by Post-it® Brand found that 61% of Americans believe they would be more productive if they used the same organizational system at home that they do at work.* As a busy teacherpreneur, I work hard to have a flexible but VISUAL system that works for me in both places. 

In Summary. The 21-Day Challenge I’m taking is:

1 – I will do one thing at a time
2 – I will leave two kind Post-it® Notes a day to others
3 – I will list three things each day that I have to do at home and at school.
That’s it.

5 Productivity Hacks and Tips to Help Get Organized

So, now on to some tips/ hacks that I’m using for the organizational system that I use. Note that I’m in the DIY-planning family. (I released a book on it last summer.) DIY means that I make my own planners.

1- Do a Brain Dump

Brain Dump with Post it Notes

As I worked on my DIY Planning system for April/May, I got everything out and on Post-it® Notes. Also, I color coded my thoughts, as this helped me figure out the categories for the back of my planner and the unique ways I’m going to use my planner this month.

When I brainstorm, I take each idea and put it on one note and put it on my desk. (see the picture) I like to color code by topic or idea for patterns to emerge. (I do this when outlining the books I write too.)

The productivity quiz from Post-it® Brand I took earlier says that  I need to keep my mind clear by doing a brain dump of all the items on my list. I also need to make sure my to-do items are showing on my calendar. Finally, I need to focus on one thing at a time. This fits with what I already know about myself.

So, as I was working on my planning system for April and May, I put all of the ideas and issues with my planner onto individual notes (pictured to the right.) Then, as I worked on my planner, I used the ideas to make sure my April/ May system will support what I need to make it through the end of the school year.

Declutter your mind by doing a brain dump of all that you have to do. Just use Post-it® Notes to make it easy. 

2 – Customize Your System Based on Your Location

My home "brain dump" of work for the week is on a top door of my desk. I don't share my desk at home, so I can do this. At school, I use a brain dump page in the back of my planner for the notes. That way, I can close it and it is private. I don't want students (who often sit at my desk) playing with or bothering my personal task list.

My home “brain dump” of work for the week is on a top door of my desk. I don’t share my desk at home, so I can do this. At school, I use a brain dump page in the back of my planner for the notes. That way, I can close it and it is private. I don’t want students (who often sit at my desk) playing with or bothering my personal task list.

At home, I brain dump my list on Post-it® Super-Sticky Notes. I have a door on the top of a cabinet that I can use to keep these. That way, I can grab what I’m working on and stick it on my computer monitor.

At school, however, I use a page in my planner designated for “brain dumps.” That is because students sometimes sit at my desk to scan pictures or use my computer and I don’t want them bothering my notes or reading them.

So, as a school teacher, some things need to be adapted to home and school.

Intentionally think about organizing your home and work. You’ll need slightly different systems for both. 

3 – Know Your Style

As a “Mindful Maverick,” I’m a visual person. Out of sight, out of mind.

That is why, although I’ve used the Reminders app on my phone some, I have to get it on paper on ONE list. But before I write it down, if I do my brain dump on Post-it® Notes, then I can organize it.

Knowing your style of organizing will help you select the best tools for you. Each person is unique. Each person remembers in a different way. For this reason, I believe that everyone’s system of planning is truly do it yourself.

Do it yourself. Customize. Use colors. Decide what works for you.

4 – Quickly Access Notes

I organize my frequently used items in the back of my planner using Post-it® Tabs. I can move the tabs around or from page to page and color code them as well.

My goal is to be able to access anything within three seconds. Why? Well, my frustration kicks in if I can’t find it before. I admit – this time of year it is hard.

Use Post-it® Tabs to organize the back of your binder so you can put your hands on important items quickly. 

5 – Make Things That Change Quickly Easy to Move Around

Also, I use a Kanban board approach which literally has me moving my Post-it® Super Sticky Notes around. (I got lots of ideas for this use from Sia Kyriakakos, 2016 Teacher of the Year for Baltimore City Schools, and art teacher from Maryland.)

When I have things that are fluid I will use smaller 3×3 Post-it® Notes. For example, with my podcast, sometimes events or things that happen cause me to move shows around. So, instead of using dry erase markers, I now use Post-it® Notes. They stick and re-stick so I can easily move them.

I write the guest name and then moving around the calendar as I see fit to determine who’s going to be up at different times.

I also use this method at school. This year, I’m teaching Digital Filmmaking. We have to plan our shooting schedule between two film crews. For the movie projects I’m working on, we write each shot on a Post-it® Note.

We list screenshots for our movie on Post-it® Notes. This makes it easy to grab a photo and go shoot.

Then, students can come in and grab a shot and go do it. Then, they put the shot on a board so the editors know the film is ready to edit.

For projects that are dynamic, you need to use Post-it® Super Sticky notes which will stick and re-stick.  

What’s next?

I hope you’ll take the productivity quiz using the Post-it® Brand Productivity Tool on Post-it.com to find what your planner style is.

I also hope that you will get organized for the end of the school year using some of these techniques of brainstorming organizing and just putting everything together.

And I challenge you to either take this 21-day productivity challenge or, create your own challenge.  Share your own planner type and your goal progress on your social channels using #makeitstick.

This is a great time of year to focus on some simple productivity techniques that will give us peace of mind and help us make it to the end of the school year without being so exhausted and stressed. We can do this!

*The 3M Productivity Survey was conducted by Wakefield Research (www.wakefieldresearch.com) among 1,021 nationally representative U.S. adults ages 18+, between March 30th and April 5th, 2017, using an email invitation and an online survey. Quotas have been set to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the U.S. adult population 18 and older. 
Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored post.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to edit and post it. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.) Please also note that all opinions are my own and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of any sponsor or employer.

The post Take the 21-day Productivity Challenge #makeitstick appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/take-the-21-day-productivity-challenge-post-it-note/

iPads in Kindergarten: Creating, Innovating and Learning

A conversation with Caitlin Arakawa on episode 82 of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Today Caitlin Arakawa @caitlin_arakawa shares what she learned in her first year with iPads in kindergarten.  Tools. A DIY Soundbooth. Mistakes. Benefits. She shares it all.

ipads in the kindergarten classroom (1)

Listen Now

Listen on iTunes

  • Stream by clicking here.
  • The transcript will be uploaded and posted right here at soon as soon as it is available.

Click the button for iTunes or Stitcher to subscribe to this show

10-Minute Teacher Show Stitcher

 

In today’s show, Caitlin Arakawa talks about iPads in kindergarten and shares:

  • Her favorite apps
  • A cool teacher hack to make sound proof booths
  • The best thing about iPads
  • Her biggest mistake
  • Her assessment of the classroom improvements

I hope you enjoy this episode with Caitlin Arakawa!

Want to hear another episode on iPads in the classroom? Listen to Karen Lirenman and Kristen Wideen talk about awesome iPad apps for the elementary classroom.

Selected Links from this Episode


Full Bio As Submitted


Caitlin ArakawaCaitlin Arakawa

Caitlin Arakawa is a 2nd year kindergarten teacher in Redlands, California. She teaches at an IB PYP school that has a focus in STEAM.

Transcript for this episode


To be posted as soon as it is available. Check back soon!

The post iPads in Kindergarten: Creating, Innovating and Learning appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/ipads-kindergarten-creating-innovating-learning/

Monday, May 22, 2017

Principal vs. Principle

Some people get confused with the terms principal and principle. This is understandable since the two words not only look similar but also sound the… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/principal-vs-principle/

Learning First, Technology Second #motivationmonday

A conversation with Liz Kolb on episode 81 of the 10-Minute Teacher

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Today Liz Kolb @lkolb talks about how we can put learning first and a very important reason technology should be second. We’re also hosting a giveaway of her new book on this show.

learning first, technology second liz kolb

Listen Now

Listen on iTunes

Click the button for iTunes or Stitcher to subscribe to this show

10-Minute Teacher Show Stitcher

 

In today’s show, Liz Kolb talks about the role of learning and technology:

  • What is the role of technology in learning
  • When technology is a distraction
  • The 3 E framework Liz teaches
  • How we can make technology improve learning and not distract from it
  • A fantastic collaborative idea with parents and students

I hope you enjoy this episode with Liz Kolb!

Want to hear another episode on improving learning with technology? Listen to Eric Sheninger talk about digital pedagogy that improves learning.

Selected Links from this Episode


Enter the giveway

Learning First, Technology Second Book Giveaway Contest

Some of the links are affiliate links.

Full Bio As Submitted


Liz KolbLiz Kolb

Liz is a clinical assistant professor in education technologies at The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI. She authored Toys to Tools: Connecting Student Cell Phones to Education (published by ISTE in 2008), Cell Phones in the Classroom: A Practical Guide for the K-12 Educator (published by ISTE in 2011), Help Your Child Learn With Their Cell Phone and Web 2.0 (published by ISTE in 2013), Learning First, Technology Second (published by ISTE in 2017).

In addition, Liz has published numerous articles and book chapters on new technologies and education in prominent publications such as Education Leadership, School Administrator Magazine, Scholastic, Edutopia, ISTE’s Edtekhub, and Learning and Leading with Technology. Liz has done consulting work and has been a featured and keynote speaker at conferences all over the United States and Canada.

Liz is currently co-chairing an auxiliary committee for the U.S. Office of Education Technology on sustainable professional development in teacher education. She is a MACUL board member and a member of the COSN advisory board for mobile learning and emerging technologies. She is passionate about engaging students in education and leveraging learning opportunity through digital technologies. Liz is also the creator and coordinator of the Triple E Framework, which is an open-source framework for K-12 teachers and administrators to use to assess the effectiveness of technology in lesson plans. Her blog is at http://cellphonesinlearning.com

Transcript for this episode


Click to download the PDF copy of the transcript

[Recording starts 0:00:00]

Learning first, technology second. This is episode 81.

The Ten-minute Teacher podcast with Vicki Davis. Every week day you’ll learn powerful practical ways to be a more remarkable teacher today.

VICKI:   Happy Motivational Monday. Liz Kolb @lkolb

is with us today talking about how we can put learning first and technology second. So Liz, this is the title of your book http://amzn.to/2q8Y9KY  that has just come out. How do we put leaning first and technology second because there’s so many toys and things we can play with out there? Isn’t it easy to get distracted?

LIZ:              It’s very easy to get distracted. And I absolutely am guilty of being distracted by the technology which is why this book came about. Over the last couple of years many teachers and administrators had come to me saying we now have a one-to-one program, we now have a lot of technology in our school through difference funding sources but now we’re worried about whether or not the technology is actually effective for the learning. We’re using it a lot but we feel as though maybe we’re using it because it is shiny and it looks good and it feels good but we’re not actually impacting learning in a way that is meaningful.

I spent six years looking through the research on what’s effective and ineffective when using technology and learning and I found that there are a lot of things that we know about goof effective instructional strategies with learning that we were leaving out when we were integrating technology. So, things like when we look at engagement, no just looking at whether not the student is using a device individually but making sure that they are having some kind of human-to-human contact co-engaging or what we call joint media engagement and working together with the screens.

[00:02:00]

This framework came about because of much of this research that I looked at and I originally developed this triple E framework http://tripleeframework.com/

which is what the book focuses on for my student teachers. They found it to be incredibly helpful, so then I have kind of decided to put it together into this book. The reason why it’s called Learning First, Technology Second is because the framework focuses on the learning goals and the end in mind and thinking about the ways that we leverage technology in order to meet those learning goals rather than focusing on the technology first and the wow of the technology.

VICKI:          So what is the triple E framework? Are you able to give us a quick summary because we’ll, of course, want to point everybody to the book?

LIZ:              Yes. So the E stands for engagement and learning goals, enhancement of learning goals and extension of learning goals. And all three of those were again, informed by the research that engagement does not necessarily mean looking at the device but it actually means what we call high attention as well as high comprehension. So they are not just focusing on the device but they’re actually focusing on the learning goals through the device in some way. And then enhancement looks at how we leverage the learning through technology, how we’re adding scaffolds in support. So is it differentiating learning? Or are we helping students get to those higher order of thinking skills. What is the value added beyond something we would do with traditional tools? There’s no value added, then we should question why we’re using it.

And then the third level is extension which talks about how technology can reach students in their everyday lives and extend learning to the authentic everyday world and make those connections for students. Kind of situating their learning in what they’re seeing in the outside world.

[00:04:00]

VICKI:          So really we don’t use technology for technology sake, technology has to actually improve learning, right?

LIZ:              That’s our hope. I am somebody who the first time I learned PowerPoint I turned all my lectures into PowerPoint thinking that was the magic snake oil that we needed to have students learn. And what I found was that while they were engaged, they weren’t actually learning more. My few students were still few students. My students who did well still did well. And so, I realized that there’s a lot of ways we use technology because it looks good and it’s kind of shiny, but if we want to look beneath the surface we really want to look at how it’s actually meeting and helping us get to the learning outcomes that we help our students get to.

VICKI:          So, Liz, this is Motivational Monday and I have all of this worry. Like, “oh my goodness.” What does work? Can you point us and motivate us, help us to point towards things that actually do work in the classroom?

LIZ:              Yea, there’s a lot of great things that work with technology. First of all, co-use is very important as I mentioned earlier. Working together on a screen is how students begin to reflect on what they’re doing on a screen. So rather than having students all working individually with headphones on and their own iPads in the classroom, pair them up, have them work together. That can make a large difference in their ability to comprehend what they’re seeing and doing in the classroom.

VICKI:          Also the other thing that we want to think about is how are we able to use technology to connect to everyday experiences. So rather than having them isolated in a piece of technology think about how we can use things like Skype http://www.skype.com  to connect to other classrooms or something like the Google Expeditions https://edu.google.com/expeditions/  to experience what it might be like in the artic if we can’t actually get there. So thinking about how we’re using technology to help students experience things that they couldn’t experience and work together.

[00:06:00]

That co-engagement is so key and it’s just a small change that you can make. Pair students up or choose a software like Google Docs http://docs.google.com that allow students to work with other people through the tool itself in a synchronous way.

VICKI:          So collaboration and working together and co-creation is widely important?

LIZ:              Yes, it is. So skills, those higher order critical thinking skills that we continue to talk about – I know many people talk about the C’s and making sure that that’s actually happening with the technology and it’s not so isolated.

VICKI:          And Liz, you know, you’re speaking my language when you talk co-creation because when we create and we help kids create things that are more than they would have been as individuals that’s when the magic happens, isn’t it?

LIZ:              It is. And it’s so amazing because the other things we do in the classroom, we often have students paired up and working together or we’re working with the students and helping them work through ideas and build knowledge together. Sometimes we put technology in front of them we forget they still need to do that, they still need to have those conversations.

VICKI:          They do. I’m just really excited to hear you talk about co-creation because it’s just not something people talk a lot about. I mean, I think people forget the greatest software every invented is the human brain. And when we truly unleash that collaboration and co-creation is when we see things that we couldn’t do without technology.

LIZ:              Absolutely. And very rarely are the greatest inventions and things we’ve seen in society individually created. There’s always a group of people working together to make that happen. So even if I can give a quick example; in my daughter’s classroom they use Google Docs to write their stories and work on editing. And the teacher actually shares with the parents when they’re going to be working on it so we can log in at the same time that they’re working on it.

And the teacher gives us some scaffolds as supports of what we should ask and how we should ask it and what we should be looking for.

[00:08:00]

So we’re having these conversations to help them build their writing and as a parent I’m also learning how to learn them, so we’re both learning at the same time.

VICKI:          Now, that’s a genius teacher. I hope after the show you’ll introduce me because you have blown my mind. I mean, I know we have helicopter parents and that’s not necessarily a good thing. However, that really is unleashing the power of parenting and partnering with teachers and parents and students, isn’t it?

LIZ:              Absolutely. And parents want to know how to help their children learn. And many times they just don’t know how to do it. So they’ll often just plug their child in front of an app or a computer to do it but in reality if the teachers can get them online at the same time and give them some support and how them how to do it the parents are really excited to do that. And I can’t tell you how excited my 4th grader is to see me logged on at the same time. And all of a sudden she’s really interested in the different forms of grammar and the detail in her writing. And it has exponentially improved her writing and my ability to see those things as well.

VICKI:          My mind is just running and there’s so many ideas with what we’ve discussed. And thinking about co-creating with parents as well as peers is very powerful. So listeners, Remarkable Teachers, we’re going to be hosting a giveaway for Learning First, Technology Second so do check the show notes www.coolcatteacher.com/e81 and enter  to win and take a look at this book. Liz has done so many great things, she’s one of the first people that I read when I really got in to using cell phones in the classroom. She has so many resources for us. But let’s really think about Learning First, Technology second. But also when we’re learning how we can be co-creating ad collaborating. I’m so excited.

Hello Remarkable Teachers, would you please help me do something? I’m trying to help more people find out about the Ten Minute Teacher Show. To do that, if you just could take some time to go to iTunes or to Stitcher or to leave a review. It really does help. Thank you so much.

Thank you for listening to the Ten-minute Teacher Podcast. You can download the show notes and see the archive at coolcatteacher.com/podcast. Never stop learning.

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The post Learning First, Technology Second #motivationmonday appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


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